framesmakeover

 “Huzzah,” you hear me shout in a true Mike the Knight fashion. The bird stamp frame has finally made it up onto the hallway wall! I’ve even motivated my lardy arse for long enough to revamp some other charity shop frames and get them up on the walls too! I even took before and after pictures! CHECK. MY. BAD. SELF.

I prefer charity shopping for frames because you can get a properly made frame for next to nothing. It’s far better than spending silly money on badly made, mass produced frames from off the shelf.

There are a few rules I follow when charity shopping for frames:

  1. Look past what’s already being framed. Just because a frame already has something in it that doesn’t appeal to your own exquisite taste, it doesn’t mean the frame won’t look good with something else inside it.
  2.   Look past the finish of the frame. Again, just because the frame isn’t a colour or material that ‘goes’ with you interior. Given a lick of paint, it’s amazing how something can be transformed.
  3. Look at the back. Look at how the frame has been made. I often look for a frame-makers sticker,  if the back panel has been taped in, and the quality of the picture hook/ hanging hooks and wire – all signs that the frame  has been hand made, is of a better quality and less likely to fall apart on you.

So. First up is the box frame. Bought for £1, it held a beautiful, brown, dried flower arrangement…If only you could hear the note of sarcasm in my brain voice. Don’t get me wrong, I’m a big lover of brown stuff – and before you say it I don’t mean poo….actually, I like to talk about poo but I don’t collect piles of it or anything. Except in the toilet. Where it is flushed away. I mean that I love retro brown. This, on the other hand, is not so much what I love. I gave the frame a lick of paint, rummaged through my portfolio of old work and found this freehand machine embroidered sample which fit perfectly. It was clearly meant to be.

It reads:  “Seek to be good, but aim not to be great.”

It is a quote taken from an 18th/19th century (can’t remember) book which advised women on how they were expected to behave. When I made it, I was looking at the roles and expectations of women throughout history, and how we have constantly been told what is ‘expected’ of us. This particular quote appealed to my sense of humour. I suppose I see it as a bit of a piss take on all the tacky modern day ‘re-affirmations’ that so many people seem to be fond of. Like the poster of the cat with “Hang on in there,” or the countless bits of crap that people post on facebook these days.

frame1before frame1after

Next up, is this cute little frame that my 4 year old son bought for me for 50p (it still had the sticker on when he gave it to me). It already had the embroidery in it, which was stitched by someone in 1979 (sticker on the back). I again painted the frame, which I think really brings out the colours in the embroidery. Love it!

frame2before frame2after

Lastly was this gold frame, bought for £2. It had a picture of a ship inside. Not that you need me to tell you that, as you can see it in the picture. I’m not a pirate and not a toff member of a sailing club, so I replaced it with one of my sketchbook pages with pictures of Russian dolls. I was coming up with ideas for a book cover for Russian female poetry at the time, this was one of my ideas. A bit more cheerful than the ship.

frame3before Frame3after

And there you have it. I feel like I’ve overdone it with all this organisation. I had better stop so that I can remain just being just good, and not great.

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About mrssloanqueenofscones

Yorkshire born and bred.

3 responses »

  1. jennastobbs says:

    So very jealous of your hall. I can vouch that all 3 frames and work look amazing. Love the grey shade you chose. X

  2. Winter Owls says:

    Your framed embroideries look fantastic in their revamped frames!

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